• Panhandle Milling

3 Killer Delicious Flavored Tortilla Wraps

Updated: May 21


In our first blog post here on the Panhandle Milling website, we gave you a fully adaptable clean label Regular tortilla Formulation. In this post, we’re going to be exploring how to adapt that formula into three very different flavor profiles for your customers. When making these, it is usually just a matter of adjusting a small percentage of flavoring in the formula. The only formula that changes the flour is the multi-grain formulation. Even then, it is only changing the main flour percentage by backing out part of the flour and replacing it with our organic sprouted wheat flour. This will give you the ability to provide a healthier tortilla for those looking to increase their whole grain intake. The process in the production of the whole grain tortillas remains almost identical to the original tortilla formulation. It is a simple adaptation your customers will love!

Here is our original tortilla formula:

LARGE SCALE HOT-PRESS PROCESS Mixing the ingredients first requires mixing all the dry ingredients and then adding the shortening. The shortening is cut into the dry mixture, ideally until a very fine texture is achieved. Only then is the water added and the dough is kneaded into smooth consistency (water absorption around 750 Farinograph Units). Less water absorption will make dough very stiff and difficult to press, yielding inferior quality tortillas. Higher water-absorption levels result in tortillas with a silky soft texture and many layers. However, this may cause rolling problems, as the dough tends to become sticky and too slack. Depending on the mixer, be very careful. You don’t want to under-mix the dough, as it will result in smaller blisters in the tortillas. Conversely, over-mixing the dough causes the dough to be overly sticky and hard to roll. Normal dough temperatures for hot-press wheat flour tortillas are 90° to 100°F. Lower dough temperatures increase water absorption and yield softer tortillas but also slow down dough relaxation and increase resting time. Plan accordingly.

Dough dividing, rounding, and resting take place immediately after mixing. Scaling weights normally vary from 1 to 2 ounces. This will depend entirely on how large the tortilla’s diameter is intended to be in the finished product. Dough pieces are transported to a proofer to rest for a short time. This allows them to become more extensible and less elastic. Gluten needs to rest. Relaxation is key to facilitate pressing. Don’t let them rest long enough and there will be translucent spots in the final product, less fluff, and funny-shaped tortillas.

Pressing occurs by transporting the relaxed dough on heated conveyor. It moves under a hydraulic press. The presses operate at 350°-450° and vary in pressure depending on your facility between 400-1100psi. During pressing, a thin skin is formed on the surface of the raw tortilla. The skin seals it to limit the expulsion of carbon dioxide and steam which causes the tortilla to expand and puff into a balloon-shape during the baking process.

Baking takes place in a three-level tortilla oven. The tortillas are baked for approximately 40 seconds at temperatures of 375° to 500°F. The tortillas start at the top level of the oven, then are flipped over to the middle oven level, and then are flipped again onto the lower conveyor before they leave the oven.

Cooling is necessary to keep tortillas from sticking together in the finished packaging as well as keeping condensation from forming that would cause the growth of mold. Tortillas are mold-free directly after baking. Avoid contamination during the cooling and packaging process. Also, proper cooling will limit how much moisture is lost after the tortillas are baked. Generally, this is achieved by moving the tortillas over multilevel conveyors.

Flavor Variations

Mixing the ingredients first requires mixing all the dry ingredients and then adding the shortening. The shortening is cut into the dry mixture, ideally until a very fine texture is achieved. Add the pesto into the water and then the water mixture is added and the dough is kneaded into smooth consistency (water absorption around 750 Farinograph Units). Less water absorption will make dough very stiff and difficult to press, yielding inferior quality tortillas. Higher water-absorption levels result in tortillas with a silky soft texture and many layers. However, this may cause rolling problems, as the dough tends to become sticky and too slack. Depending on the mixer, be very careful. You don’t want to undermix the dough, as it will result in smaller blisters in the tortillas. Conversely, overmixing the dough causes the dough to be overly sticky and hard to roll. Normal dough temperatures for hot-press wheat flour tortillas are 90° to 100°F. Lower dough temperatures increase water absorption and yield softer tortillas but also slow down dough relaxation and increase resting time. Plan accordingly. Continue as directed above for the rest of production.

Mixing the ingredients first requires mixing all the dry ingredients (including the spice blend) and then adding the shortening. The shortening is cut into the dry mixture, ideally until a very fine texture is achieved. Only then is the water added and the dough is kneaded into smooth consistency (water absorption around 750 Farinograph Units). Less water absorption will make dough very stiff and difficult to press, yielding inferior quality tortillas. Higher water-absorption levels result in tortillas with a silky soft texture and many layers. However, this may cause rolling problems, as the dough tends to become sticky and too slack. Depending on the mixer, be very careful. You don’t want to under-mix the dough, as it will result in smaller blisters in the tortillas. Conversely, over-mixing the dough causes the dough to be overly sticky and hard to roll. Normal dough temperatures for hot-press wheat flour tortillas are 90° to 100°F. Lower dough temperatures increase water absorption and yield softer tortillas but also slow down dough relaxation and increase resting time. Plan accordingly. Continue as directed above for the rest of production.

Mixing the ingredients first requires mixing all the dry ingredients (including the seeds and whole wheat flour) and then adding the shortening. The shortening is cut into the dry mixture, ideally until a very fine texture is achieved. Only then is the water added and the dough is kneaded into smooth consistency (water absorption around 750 Farinograph Units). Less water absorption will make dough very stiff and difficult to press, yielding inferior quality tortillas. Higher water-absorption levels result in tortillas with a silky soft texture and many layers. However, this may cause rolling problems, as the dough tends to become sticky and too slack. Depending on the mixer, be very careful. You don’t want to under mix the dough, as it will result in smaller blisters in the tortillas. Conversely, over-mixing the dough causes the dough to be overly sticky and hard to roll. Normal dough temperatures for hot-press wheat flour tortillas are 90° to 100°F. Lower dough temperatures increase water absorption and yield softer tortillas but also slow down dough relaxation and increase resting time. Plan accordingly. Continue as directed above for the rest of production.

Just want to Make Some at Home?

Our Chef’s Homemade Tortillas

5 cups Panhandle Milling Tortilla Flour 1 Tbsp salt 1 Tbsp baking powder 1 cup shortening or lard 2 cups boiling water

Directions: • Cut shortening into flour, baking powder, salt, and seasoning with the paddle in an electric mixer, Mix until the shortening is in fine pieces smaller than peas. • BOIL 2 cups water and dump boiling water into the flour mixture and combine with paddle or spoon by hand about 1 minute. • Remove dough from the bowl and form into 12-18 balls, depending on the size of the tortillas you want. 12 will make 8-10 inch tortillas, 18 will make 4-6 inch tortillas. Roll the tortillas into rounds. Using the boiling water eliminates the need to use flour on the board. Just roll out into a 6-8 inch tortilla. Cook on a moderate skillet (medium heat) until done (about 2 minutes on each side). It should bubble up. Cover with moist dishcloth to keep tender. Serve immediately. Flavor Variations: Pesto: Add ½ cup prepared pesto to boiling water before stirring into the dry ingredients. Prepare tortillas as usual. Ancho Chile: Add 3 Tbsp Ancho Chile or Fajita Seasoning to the dry ingredients. Prepare tortillas as usual. Multigrain: Replace 1 cup of the tortilla flour with Panhandle Whole Wheat flour and add ¼ cup flax and 2 Tbsp millet seed to the dry ingredients. Prepare tortillas as usual.

#tortillaflour #cleanlabel #tortilla

  • Grey Twitter Icon
  • Grey Instagram Icon
  • Grey LinkedIn Icon
  • Grey Facebook Icon

Panhandle Milling is a PHM Brands company

730 17th St., Ste. 600

Denver, CO 80202

800-897-5226

ALL PHM BRANDS & COMPANIES